Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture

Alliant Techsystems (ATK)
A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System
Graphic of ATK's technology
Program: 
ARPA-E Award: 
$2,684,881
Location: 
Minneapolis, MN
Project Term: 
07/01/2010 to 06/30/2013
Project Status: 
ALUMNI
Technical Categories: 
Critical Need: 
Coal-fired power plants provide nearly 50% of all electricity in the U.S. While coal is a cheap and abundant natural resource, its continued use contributes to rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere. Capturing and storing this CO2 would reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas levels while allowing power plants to continue using inexpensive coal. Carbon capture and storage represents a significant cost to power plants that must retrofit their existing facilities to accommodate new technologies. Reducing these costs is the primary objective of the IMPACCT program.
Project Innovation + Advantages: 
Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATK's design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.
Impact Summary: 
If successful, ATK's technology would collect and remove CO2 at half the cost to coal-fired power plants of current-generation carbon capture and storage technologies.
Security: 
Enabling continued use of domestic coal for electricity generation will preserve the stability of the electric grid.
Environment: 
Carbon capture technology could prevent more than 800 million tons of CO2 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year.
Economy: 
Improving the cost-effectiveness of carbon capture methods will minimize added costs to homeowners and businesses using electricity generated by coal-fired power plants for the foreseeable future.
Contacts
ARPA-E Program Director: 
Dr. Karma Sawyer
Project Contact: 
Dr. Vladimir Balepin
Partners
ACENT Labs