Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

ARPA-E Projects

Search ARPA-E Projects by Keyword

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2
Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC)
Program: 
Project Term: 
04/01/2016 to 09/30/2019
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Project State: 
Maine
Technical Categories: 

The Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) will develop an innovative, self-deploying MHK power system, which will reduce the operating costs and improve the efficiency of MHK systems by up to 50%. ORPC's system is based on pitch control of the blades of a cross-flow turbine, in which the tidal flow passes across the turbine blades rather than in a radial fashion. This system will allow the turbine to self-propel itself to the deployment location, and lower itself to the sea floor remotely. This innovative approach will allow for lower costs of deployment and retrieval, reduced requirements for sea-bed foundation construction, as well as increased turbine efficiency. The ORPC team will design, build, and test a model scale of the MHK system to demonstrate the benefits of using a self-deploying turbine, before completing the design and cost analysis of the full-scale commercial system. Successful deployment of this system would significantly reduce the LCOE associated with MHK systems, making the technology a viable renewable resource to generate electrical power.

University of New England (UNE)
Program: 
Project Term: 
02/06/2018 to 02/05/2021
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Project State: 
Maine
Technical Categories: 

The University of New England (UNE) will lead a MARINER Category 3 project to develop a high-resolution, 3D computational modeling tool for simulating hydrodynamic forces on macroalgae cultivation and harvest systems. Advanced modeling tools can help inform decisions about farm structure and the significant capital investment required. UNE's modeling tool will quantify fluid dynamics and mechanical stress at the sub-meter level. The tool will have the capability to evaluate a wide range of offshore macroalgae systems and allow specification of components to withstand storm events, prevent over-engineering, and optimize capital costs. On-shore tank testing and validation at a location in the Gulf of Maine will be used to obtain data necessary to validate the tool's accuracy. The field samples will help quantify the growth as a function of environmental conditions throughout the macroalgae-growing season in the Gulf of Maine. If successful, the completed tool will accelerate the engineering, testing, permitting, and operation of new macroalgae systems.