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ARPA-E Projects

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Displaying 1 - 2 of 2
Program: 
Project Term: 
05/15/2015 to 08/12/2017
Project Status: 
ALUMNI
Project State: 
Nebraska
Technical Categories: 

LI-COR Biosciences is working with Colorado State University (CSU) and Gener8 to develop cost-effective, highly sensitive optical methane sensors that can be integrated into mobile or stationary methane monitoring systems. Their laser-based sensor utilizes optical cavity techniques, which provide long path lengths and high methane sensitivity and selectivity, but previously have been costly. The team will employ a novel sensor design developed in parallel with advanced manufacturing techniques to enable a substantial cost reduction. The sensors are expected to provide exceptional long-term stability, enabling robust, unattended field deployment and further reducing total cost-of-ownership. CSU will test representative sensor prototypes and demonstrate the sensor's application to leak detection and quantification. The team's proposed sensor could decrease the expense of today's monitoring technologies and encourage widespread adoption of methane monitoring and mitigation at natural gas wellpads.

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL)
Program: 
Project Term: 
09/01/2016 to 08/31/2017
Project Status: 
ALUMNI
Project State: 
Nebraska
Technical Categories: 

The University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL) will develop an innovative concept for an electromagnetic induction-based static power converter for AC to AC electrical conversions. Their method will use a new device, the magnetic flux valve, to actively control the magnetic flux of the converter. The voltages induced across the device can be controlled by varying the magnetic fluxes. By synthesizing the induced voltages appropriately, the converter can take an AC input and generate an AC output with controllable amplitude, frequency, and waveform. During this project, the team plans to prove the concept of the magnetic flux valve; prove the concept for variable-frequency and variable voltage AC-AC electrical energy conversion; and conduct a study on the scalability of the magnetic flux valve and electromagnetic power converter concepts. If successful, the technology has the potential to achieve lower cost, higher energy density, and higher efficiency than traditional energy conversion technologies. More efficient conversion technologies for high voltage and high power applications can lead to new innovations in renewable power generation and smart grid applications.