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ARPA-E Projects

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Displaying 1 - 3 of 3
West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC)
Program: 
Project Term: 
11/03/2015 to 04/02/2020
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Project State: 
West Virginia
Technical Categories: 
West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC), along with its partners at ANSYS, Inc., Sustainable Engineering, Wilson Works, and Stryke Industries, will develop a CHP generator for residential use based on a two-stroke, spark-ignited free-piston internal combustion engine (ICE). Traditional internal combustion engines use the force generated by the combustion of a fuel (natural gas in this case) to move a piston, transferring chemical energy to mechanical energy, which when used in conjunction with a generator produces electricity. This free-piston design differs from traditional slider-crank ICE models by eliminating the crankshaft and using a spring to increase frequency and stabilize operation. The resulting design is compact with few moving parts and has reduced frictional losses. In place of a traditional alternator, this engine drives a permanent magnet linear electric generator.
West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC)
Program: 
Project Term: 
04/01/2017 to 08/31/2021
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Project State: 
West Virginia
Technical Categories: 
West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC) will develop a process to convert renewable electricity, water, and air into ammonia using plasma excitation at low temperatures and pressures. This process is different from both electrochemical conversion processes and catalytic processes like the HB process. In this form of physical activation, the microwave-plasma process can activate nitrogen and hydrogen, generating ions and free radicals that react over the catalyst surface to form ammonia. Under the correct conditions, microwave heating can selectively heat the catalyst to the temperature required for reactions without heating the surrounding area. This combination of a very hot catalyst and cool surroundings leads to overall lower reaction temperatures and improved energy efficiency. The lower pressure required for the process will also simplify the design. Both features enable better integration with renewable energy sources because the system can be turned on and off more quickly. Such advantages increase the cost competitiveness of the team's approach.
West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC)
Program: 
Project Term: 
06/12/2017 to 12/11/2019
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Project State: 
West Virginia
Technical Categories: 

West Virginia University Research Corporation (WVURC) and their partner, Infinia Technology Corporation, propose to demonstrate an advanced Stirling power generation system for residential CHP applications. A Stirling engine uses a working gas housed in a sealed environment, in this case the working gas is helium. When heated by the natural gas-fueled burner, the helium expands causing a piston to move and interact with a linear alternator to produce electricity. As the gas cools and contracts, the process resets before repeating again. Advanced Stirling engines endeavor to carefully manage heat inside the system to make the most efficient use of the natural gas energy. This project makes extensive use of additive manufacturing i.e. constructing components one layer at a time - similar to 3D printing. They propose using additive manufacturing because building the system as one piece minimizes interfacial heat losses and improves heat transfer, leading to increased efficiency.