Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

CO2 Sensor for Demand-controlled Ventilation

Matrix Sensors

Stable, Low Cost, Low Power, CO2 Sensor for Demand-controlled Ventilation

Program: 
ARPA-E Award: 
$1,529,831
Location: 
San Diego, CA
Project Term: 
06/21/2018 to 06/20/2020
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Technical Categories: 
Critical Need: 

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) consumes a significant portion of the energy used in buildings. Much of this is wasted energy, used when buildings are either not occupied at all, or occupied well under their maximum design conditions. Traditional motion sensors are often used in buildings to adjust lighting levels, but they cannot provide advanced quantitative information about the environment. New classes of sensor systems used to enable advanced control of HVAC levels can include human presence sensors, people counting sensors, and low-cost CO2 sensors. Their improved accuracy and reliability can reduce energy consumption for homes and commercial environments.

Project Innovation + Advantages: 

Matrix Sensors and its partners will develop a low-cost CO2 sensor module that can be used to enable better control of ventilation in commercial buildings. Matrix Sensor's module uses a solid-state architecture that leverages scalable semiconductor manufacturing processes. Key to this architecture is a suitable sensor material that can selectively adsorb CO2, release the molecule when the concentration decreases, and complete this process quickly to enable real-time sensing. The team's design will use a new class of porous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs possess high gas uptake properties, molecule selectivity and high stability. As the MOF adsorbs and desorbs CO2, a connected transducer detects the change in mass. Beyond developing the MOF, key goals for the team include developing capable transducers for the MOF gas sensor, as well as the development of wireless sensor module which will be self-contained including the sensor element, micro-processor, battery, and wireless interface. The sensor will be wall-mounted and easily installed since it will not require wired power. If successful, the project will result in a CO2 sensor system with a total cost of ownership that is 5 to 10x lower than today's systems.

Potential Impact: 

If successful, SENSOR projects will dramatically reduce the amount of energy needed to effectively heat, cool, and ventilate buildings without sacrificing occupant comfort.

Security: 

Lower electricity consumption by buildings eases strain on the grid, helping to improve resilience and reduce demand during peak hours, when the threat of blackouts is greatest.

Environment: 

Using significantly less energy could help reduce emissions attributed to power generation. In addition, improved interior air quality could help prevent negative effects on human health.

Economy: 

Buildings will require less energy to operate, reducing heating, cooling, and ventilation costs for businesses and families. In addition, better controlled ventilation may lead to improved indoor air quality (ensured by an accurate occupant count, and validated via widespread CO2 detection) may lead to improved worker productivity and academic performance.

Contacts
ARPA-E Program Director: 
Dr. Marina Sofos
Project Contact: 
Dr. Steve Yamamoto
Release Date: 
11/16/2017