Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Reversible Fuel Cells for Long Duration Storage

University of Tennessee (UT)
Reversible Fuel Cells for Long-duration Storage
Program: 
ARPA-E Award: 
$1,499,149
Location: 
Knoxville, TN
Project Term: 
06/06/2019 to 06/05/2021
Project Status: 
ACTIVE
Technical Categories: 
Critical Need: 
Stationary electrical energy storage plays several important roles in the U.S. electricity system, and these are expected to grow as the grid continues to evolve. Long-duration energy storage systems address grid needs beyond those covered by daily cycling. Such systems could provide backup power for several days, improving grid resiliency, or allow for the integration of even larger amounts of intermittent renewable sources like wind and solar. In the near term, such systems could help shape the output from individual wind and solar installations, improving the reliability of these resources and thus greatly increasing their value to the grid.
Project Innovation + Advantages: 
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville team will develop an energy storage system based on an innovative electrolyzer/fuel cell combination. Typically, fuel cells produce water from hydrogen and oxygen. The Tennessee team will instead use the fuel cell to produce hydrogen peroxide, a liquid that can be stored. When extra power is needed on the grid, the fuel cell will produce peroxide and electricity. Available electricity then can be used to convert the peroxide back to hydrogen and oxygen during the charging cycle, which can be stored for future use. The benefit of using peroxide rather than water is higher efficiency in both charging and discharging the system.
Potential Impact: 
If successful, DAYS projects will provide new forms of long-duration stationary electricity storage systems that enhance grid resiliency, provide low-cost energy capacity, support grid infrastructure, and enable a greater share of intermittent renewable resources in the generation mix.
Security: 
Long-duration storage can help prevent blackouts and smooth overall grid operation, improving resilience and enhancing grid security.
Environment: 
New, extended storage options could enable greater integration of intermittent renewable energy sources, greatly reducing emissions from the power sector.
Economy: 
Energy storage technologies could help improve grid efficiency and promote the growth of domestic renewable energy sources.
Contacts
ARPA-E Program Director: 
Dr. Scott Litzelman
Project Contact: 
Prof. Thomas Zawodzinski
Release Date: 
9/18/2018