Blog Posts
ARPA-E focuses on next-generation energy innovation to create a sustainable energy future. The agency provides R&D support to businesses, universities, and national labs to develop technologies that could fundamentally change the way we get, use, and store energy. Since 2009, ARPA-E has provided approximately $2 billion in support to more than 800 energy technology projects. Last month, we introduced a new series to highlight the transformational technology our project teams are developing across the energy portfolio. Check out these projects turning ideas into reality.

Blog Posts
Every year, convention centers around the world fill with eager attendees looking for a chance to experience firsthand the latest and greatest in the world of automobile innovation. Whether you’re a classic gearhead or technology enthusiast, the auto manufacturers’ annual showcase season is truly a sight to behold. To celebrate car show season, here’s a quick look at some of ARPA-E’s transportation portfolio and a few projects that could one day shape how Americans get around. 

Slick Sheet: Project
Sylvatex will use a low-cost, high-yield, and simplified continuous approach to synthesize lithium iron phosphate iron (LFP) based cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) where the reactants flow and mix continuously. Sylvatex’s proprietary nanomaterial platform has already demonstrated a significant breakthrough in synthesizing cathode materials for LIBs.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Maryland (UMD) recently invented an elegant and scalable molecular engineering technique for fabricating a cellulose nanofiber (CNF)-based SSE that could overcome many of these problems. Unlike current SSEs, the CNF-based SSE uses natural materials, is easy to process, and is compatible with conventional coating processes. It can also be inexpensively manufactured due to its low material cost and paper-like roll-to-roll manufacturing, both as standalone electrolyte films and the electrolyte portion of solid-state cathodes for lithium ion and metallic lithium cells.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Houston will develop a battery that will match the energy and power densities of lithium-based batteries while excluding lithium, nickel, and cobalt. The proposed battery will substitute lithium-based anodes with energy-dense and abundant magnesium, of which the U.S. has virtually unlimited reserves. Organic materials obtained from oil refineries and biorefineries will replace conventional cathodes based on transition metals, thereby eliminating any requirement for nickel or cobalt.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Michigan aims to develop a new type of battery separator that can completely stop dendrite formation. The key innovation is a special mechanism that suppresses dendrite growth with the University of Michigan’s wet-process-synthesized film as a separator or coating. When an electrode surface starts to lose stability upon lithium deposition, any protrusion will cause deformation of the film, generating a local shielding effect that deflects lithium ions away from the tip of the protrusion. This slows down the tip growth and makes the lithium metal surface flat.

Slick Sheet: Program

Slick Sheet: Program

Slick Sheet: Program

Slick Sheet: Program