Displaying 951 - 1000 of 1054

Status: ACTIVE
State: NE
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL)

Novel Commercial Farm-field Network to Quantify Emissions and Carbon Storage from Agricultural Bioenergy Feedstock Production

The University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL) will leverage existing data sets and new data collection methodologies to quantify fertilizer- and biomass-induced emissions, biomass nitrogen content, carbon dioxide uptake, and soil organic carbon sequestered—while providing agronomic management insights to farmers, farming communities, and agricultural supply chains. This team will use eddy covariance flux towers and static chamber methods to quantify field-scale emissions, while using active chambers to quantify fertilizer and soil surface biomass emissions. UNL will combine the data with site-…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NV
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Fire-Resistant Solid Electrolytes

The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) is developing a solid-state, non-flammable electrolyte to make today’s Li-Ion vehicle batteries safer. Today’s Li-Ion batteries use a flammable liquid electrolyte—the material responsible for shuttling Li-Ions back and forth across the battery—that can catch fire when overheated or overcharged. UNLV will replace this flammable electrolyte with a fire-resistant material called lithium-rich anti-perovskite. This new electrolyte material would help make vehicle batteries safer in an accident while also increasing battery performance by extending vehicle…


Status: ACTIVE
State: ME
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

University of New England (UNE)

Modeling Tool for Ocean-Deployed Farms

The University of New England (UNE) will lead a MARINER Category 3 project to develop a high-resolution, 3D computational modeling tool for simulating hydrodynamic forces on macroalgae cultivation and harvest systems. Advanced modeling tools can help inform decisions about farm structure and the significant capital investment required. UNE’s modeling tool will quantify fluid dynamics and mechanical stress at the sub-meter level. The tool will have the capability to evaluate a wide range of offshore macroalgae systems and allow specification of components to withstand storm events, prevent…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015

University of New Mexico (UNM)

Efficient Ammonia Production

The team led by the University of New Mexico will develop a modular electrochemical process for a power-to-fuel system that can synthesize ammonia directly from nitrogen and water. The proposed synthesis approach will combine chemical and electrochemical steps to facilitate the high-energy step of breaking the nitrogen-nitrogen bond, with projected conversion efficiencies above 70%. By operating at lower temperature and pressure and reducing the air-separation requirement, this technology reduces overall system complexity, thus potentially enabling smaller-scale production at equal or lower…


Status: ALUMNI
State: ND
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC)

Water-Efficient Power Generation

University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) is developing an air-cooling alternative for power plants that helps maintain operating efficiency during electricity production with low environmental impact. The project addresses the shortcomings of conventional dry cooling, including high cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. UND-EERC’s device would use an air-cooled adsorbent liquid that results in more efficient power production with no water consumption. The technology could be applied to a broad range of plants including…


Status: ACTIVE
State: ND
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC)

Hydrolytic Softening of Ocean Water for Carbon Dioxide Removal

Hydrolytic softening is a lower-cost process to remove CO2 from the oceans. It has similarities to processes at conventional water treatment facilities, which mix hydrated lime to “soften” water by precipitating dissolved inorganic carbon as calcium carbonate. In hydrolytic softening, however, instead of a consumptive use of lime, the calcium carbonate is decomposed. This releases CO2 gas for sequestration or industrial use and regenerates the lime for continued cycles of carbon removal. Hydrolytic softening can reduce energy input costs for CO2 removal by 77% compared to state-of-the-art…


Status: ALUMNI
State: IN
Project Term: -
Program: BEETIT

University of Notre Dame

Carbon Dioxide and Ionic Liquid Refrigerants

The University of Notre Dame is developing an air-conditioning system with a new ionic liquid and CO2 as the working fluid. Synthetic refrigerants used in air conditioning and refrigeration systems are potent GHGs and can trap 1,000 times more heat in the atmosphere than CO2 alone—making CO2 an attractive alternative for synthetic refrigerants in cooling systems. However, operating cooling systems with pure CO2 requires prohibitively high pressures and expensive hardware. Notre Dame is creating a new fluid made of CO2 and ionic liquid that enables the use of CO2 at low pressures and requires…


Status: ALUMNI
State: IN
Project Term: -
Program: IMPACCT

University of Notre Dame

Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids

The University of Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust…


Status: ACTIVE
State: OK
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

University of Oklahoma

An Innovative Zero-Liquid Discharge Intermediate-Cold-Liquid Eutectic-Freeze Desalination System

The University of Oklahoma will develop a novel, zero-liquid discharge freeze system to remove dissolved salt from contaminated water, such as is produced by industrial processes like oil and gas extraction. The project will take advantage of the density difference between water and ice to extract pure ice from a salty brine, using a cooling approach that maximizes efficiency and avoids the need for energy-intensive evaporation methods. The system will operate under atmospheric pressure and be capable of treating highly concentrated/contaminated water. If successful, the treated water would…


Status: ALUMNI
State: PA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of Pittsburgh

CO2 Thickeners for Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery

The University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) is developing a compound to increase the viscosity of—or thicken—liquid carbon dioxide (CO2). This higher-viscosity CO2 compound could be used to improve the performance of enhanced oil recovery techniques. Crude oil is found deep below the surface of the earth in layers of sandstone and limestone, and one of the ways to increase our ability to recover it is to inject a high-pressure CO2 solvent into these layers. Unfortunately, because the solvent is less viscous—or thinner—than oil, it is not robust enough to uniformly sweep the oil out of the rock and…


Status: ACTIVE
State: PA
Project Term: -
Program: REPAIR

University of Pittsburgh

Innervated Pipelines: A New Technology Platform for In-Situ Repair and Embedded Intelligence

The University of Pittsburg team will pursue a new vision for in-situ repair and rehabilitation of pipelines with value added embedded sensing to complement existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and in-line inspection techniques. The team will demonstrate robotically deployable cold spray-based processes for producing a metallic pipe within the original structure and explore the feasibility of embedded fiber optic sensors within the newly constructed internal pipe. Acoustic NDE methods will be coupled with embedded fiber optic sensors as well as machine learning-based frameworks to…


Status: ACTIVE
State: PA
Project Term: -
Program: FLECCS

University of Pittsburgh

Natural Gas/Direct Air Capture Hybrid Plant

The University of Pittsburgh’s team will develop a hybrid plant model consisting of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant coupled with membrane and sorbent carbon capture systems. During peak hours, the NGCC plant produces power, and the two sequential carbon capture systems capture roughly 99% of the CO2 produced by the combustion of natural gas. During off-peak hours, the NGCC plant powers the two carbon capture systems to capture the CO2 from the air, as well as capturing all the CO2 produced by the plant. The team will optimize the hybrid model to minimize cost and study how the…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: BETHE

University of Rochester

Advanced Inertial Fusion Energy Target Designs and Driver Development

The University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics ($1.75M) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) ($1.75M) will advance inertial fusion energy (IFE) by developing (1) innovative direct-drive, high-bandwidth, high-gain target designs using high-bandwidth laser technologies with < 1 MJ of laser input energy, and (2) high-efficiency, high-bandwidth IFE drivers to eventually enable experimental demonstration of the advanced target designs. The new laser-driver technologies, including both diode-pumped solid-state and excimer lasers, are expected to mitigate laser-plasma…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: MOSAIC

University of Rochester

Planar Light Guide Concentrated Photovoltaics

The University of Rochester along with partners Arzon Solar and RPC Photonics will develop a micro-CPV system based on Planar Light Guide (PLG) solar concentrators. The PLG uses a top lenslet layer to focus and concentrate sunlight towards injection facets. These facets guide and redirect light, like a mirror, towards a PV cell at the edge of the device. Combined, these methods lead to higher efficiency over conventional FPV systems. At fewer than 3 mm thick, the system will be thin and flat, similar to traditional FPV panels. The PLG system also reduces complexity and costs by only requiring…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: BETHE

University of Rochester

A Simulation Resource Team for Innovative Fusion Concepts

Numerical simulations are critically important for the design and development of fusion concepts. However, establishing an adequate simulation capability for a fusion concept can easily be more expensive and time-consuming than building the first experiment. This Capability Team will provide simulation support for fusion-concept teams and independent analysis of fusion concepts. The FLASH, TriForce, and OSIRIS codes were chosen for this project because they are flexible, high-performance, multi-dimensional codes, all with the potential to be used by concept teams to carry out their own…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics

LLE Diagnostic Resource Team for the Advancement of Innovative Fusion Concepts

Form a diagnostic resource team to provide travelling diagnostics, calibrations, analysis techniques, and diagnostic consultants to fusion projects. The diagnostics that will be provided are a neutron time of flight detector, neutron activation detectors, and a time-resolved x-ray imaging system.


Status: ALUMNI
State: SC
Project Term: -
Program: REBELS

University of South Carolina

Bi-functional Ceramic Fuel Cell Energy System

The University of South Carolina is developing an intermediate-temperature, ceramic-based fuel cell that will both generate and store electrical power with high efficiencies. Reducing operating temperatures for fuel cells is critical to enabling distributed power generation. The device will incorporate a newly discovered ceramic electrolyte and nanostructured electrodes that enable it to operate at temperatures lower than 500ºC, far below the temperatures associated with fuel cells for grid-scale power generation. The fuel cell’s unique design includes an iron-based layer that stores…


Status: ALUMNI
State: FL
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

University of South Florida (USF)

Efficient Phase-Change Materials

The University of South Florida (USF) is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: ENLITENED

University of Southern California (USC)

Photonic Project Evaluation

The University of Southern California (USC) will develop a framework and testbed for evaluating proposed photonic and optical-electronic interconnect technologies, such as those developed under the ARPA-E ENLITENED program. These new approaches will develop novel network topologies enabled by integrated photonics technologies, which use light instead of electricity to transmit information. USC’s effort aims to offer an impartial assessment of these emerging datacenter concepts and architectures and their ability to reduce overall power consumption in a meaningful way. The team will focus on…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: GRIDS

University of Southern California (USC)

Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

University of Southern California (USC) is developing an iron-air rechargeable battery for large-scale energy storage that could help integrate renewable energy sources into the electric grid. Iron-air batteries have the potential to store large amounts of energy at low cost—iron is inexpensive and abundant, while oxygen is freely obtained from the air we breathe. However, current iron-air battery technologies have suffered from low efficiency and short life spans. USC is working to dramatically increase the efficiency of the battery by placing chemical additives on the battery's iron-…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of Southern California (USC)

Inexpensive, Metal-free, Organic Flow Battery

University of Southern California (USC) is developing a water-based, metal-free, grid-scale flow battery that will be cheaper and more rapidly produced than other batteries. Flow batteries store chemical energy in external tanks instead of within the battery container. This allows for cost-effective scalability because adding storage capacity is as simple as expanding the tank. Batteries for grid-scale energy storage must be inexpensive, robust, and sustainable—many of today’s mature battery technologies do not meet all these requirements. Using innovative designs and extremely low-cost…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MS
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

University of Southern Mississippi (USM)

Adjustable Depth Seaweed Growth System

The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) will lead a MARINER Category 1 project to design and develop a novel, robust seaweed growth system capable of deployment across the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. The technology will enable precise positioning of large farm structures to maximize productivity and actively avoid surface hazards such as weather or marine traffic. The seaweed will grow while affixed to support ropes strung between concentric rings. The structure will have automated buoyancy compensation devices to optimize depth minute-by-minute for maximum light…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MS
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

University of Southern Mississippi (USM)

SeaweedPaddock Pelagic Sargassum Ranching

The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) will lead a MARINER Category 1 project to design and develop a semi-autonomous enclosure, called a seaweed paddock, to contain and grow mats of free-floating Sargassum, a brown seaweed species native to the eastern Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. One of the major cost drivers for production of macroalgae is the expense of the farming equipment, particularly anchors used to hold the farms in place in a particular spot in the ocean. Unlike most kelps, Sargassum does not require anchoring to a fixed structure, but rather will grow as…


Status: ACTIVE
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: MEITNER

University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Magnetically Suspended Canned Rotor Pumps for the Integral Molten Salt Reactor

The University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are developing and performance testing an innovative prototype pump for a small, modular, advanced molten salt nuclear reactor (MSR). The reliability of fuel salt circulation pumps is important to MSR commercial deployment since these pumps must operate leak-free for years at high temperature and in an extreme radiation environment. Present generation pumps are restricted to long vertical shafts with bearings located above the salt line, decreasing both pump lifetime and efficiency. This project will incorporate two…


Status: ACTIVE
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: DAYS

University of Tennessee (UT)

Reversible Fuel Cells for Long Duration Storage

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville team will develop an energy storage system based on an innovative electrolyzer/fuel cell combination. Typically, fuel cells produce water from hydrogen and oxygen. The Tennessee team will instead use the fuel cell to produce hydrogen peroxide, a liquid that can be stored. When extra power is needed on the grid, the fuel cell will produce peroxide and electricity. Available electricity then can be used to convert the peroxide back to hydrogen and oxygen during the charging cycle, which can be stored for future use. The benefit of using peroxide rather…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS

University of Tennessee (UT)

Reversible Air Batteries

The University of Tennessee (UT) will develop a reversible Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) catalyst that can be used both as a peroxide-producing electrolyzer and in reversible air batteries. The ORR catalyst development seeks to significantly improve peroxide electrolysis efficiency and achieve high charge and discharge rates in air-breathing batteries. In conjunction with the new catalyst, an anion exchange membrane (AEM) will be used to further increase the electrolyzer efficiency and reduce peroxide production costs. In the reversible air battery, the AEM increases battery power…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of Tennessee (UT)

High Throughput Bioengineering of Switchgrass

The University of Tennessee (UT) is developing technology to rapidly screen the genetic traits of individual plant cells for their potential to improve biofuel crops. By screening individual cells, researchers can identify which lines are likely to be good cellulosic feedstocks without waiting for the plants to grow to maturity. UT’s technology will allow high throughput screening of engineered plant cells to identify those with traits that significantly reduce the time and resources required to maximize biofuel production from switchgrass.


Status: ALUMNI
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015

University of Tennessee (UT)

Advanced Bioengineering for Biofuels

The University of Tennessee (UT) team proposes to develop a tool that will revolutionize plant metabolic engineering by using a large scale DNA synthesis strategy. The UT team will develop synthetic chloroplast (the part of the plant cell where photosynthesis occurs) genomes, called “synplastomes.” Rather than introducing or editing genes individually inside the plant cell, the UT team will synthesize a complete chloroplast genome in the laboratory that can be readily modified and then introduced into the plant. UT’s synplastomes will have significant advantages over conventional…


Status: ACTIVE
State: TN
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015

University of Tennessee (UT)

Smart and Flexible Microgrid

University of Tennessee (UT), along with their partners, will develop a new type of microgrid design, along with its corresponding controller. Like most other microgrids, it will have solar PV-based distributed generation and be capable of grid-connected or disconnected (islanded) operations. Unlike other microgrids, this design will incorporate smart grid capabilities including intelligent switches and high-speed communication links. The included controller will accommodate and utilize these smart grid features for enhanced performance and reduced costs. The microgrid controller will be open…


Status: ACTIVE
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

University of Texas

Nanotechnology-Enabled Transformer Life Extension

University of Texas at Austin (UT- Austin) will use novel nanotechnology to develop a power transformer capable of operating for 80 years, increasing U.S. grid reliability. Key elements of UT- Austin’s research includes (1) the development and synthesis of cellulosic material and nano-additives (boron nitride, oxides) for paper and pressboard, (2) use of validated high-fidelity models to predict the thermal and electrical performance and life of transformers, (3) refurbishing a transformer to assess the impact of new materials, and (4) scale-up manufacturing of down-selected nanomaterials.


Status: ACTIVE
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: DIFFERENTIATE

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Learning Optimal Aerodynamic Designs

The University of Texas at Austin proposes to create efficient, accurate, and scalable deep neural network (DNN) representations of design optimization problem solutions. The inputs to these DNN representations will be the vector of design requirement parameters, the outputs will be the optimal design variables, and the goal is to learn the map from inputs to outputs (i.e., inverse design). The team will focus on the problem of the optimal shape design of aerodynamic lifting surfaces—in particular aircraft wings—using Reynolds-Average Navier Stokes models for minimal drag and energy savings.…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles

The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: MOVE

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Single-Piston Natural Gas Compressor

The Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) is developing an at-home natural gas refueling system that compresses natural gas using a single piston. Typically, at-home refueling stations use reciprocating compressor technology, in which an electric motor rotates a crankshaft tied to several pistons in a multi-stage compressor. These compressor systems can be inefficient and their complex components make them expensive to manufacture, difficult to maintain, and short-lived. The UT Austin design uses a single piston compressor driven by a directly coupled…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Smart Window Coatings

The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) is developing low-cost coatings that control how light enters buildings through windows. By individually blocking infrared and visible components of sunlight, UT Austin’s design would allow building occupants to better control the amount of heat and the brightness of light that enters the structure, saving heating, cooling, and lighting costs. These coatings can be applied to windows using inexpensive techniques similar to spray-painting a car to keep the cost per window low. Windows incorporating these coatings and a simple control system have…


Status: ACTIVE
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: ATLANTIS

University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas)

A Low-Cost Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind System

The University of Texas at Dallas (UT-Dallas) team plans to develop a floating turbine design featuring a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). The design will exploit inherent VAWT characteristics favorable to deep water environments and use a CCD approach to overcome common challenges. VAWTs offer advantages over traditional offshore wind designs because they have a lower vertical center of gravity and center of pressure; require a smaller, less expensive floating platform; do not need yaw control systems; and have the potential to reduce operations and maintenance costs due to platform-level…


Status: ALUMNI
State: TX
Project Term: -
Program: REACT

University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas)

Double-Stator Motor Design

University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) is developing a unique electric motor with the potential to efficiently power future classes of EVs and renewable power generators. Unlike many of today's best electric motors—which contain permanent magnets that use expensive, imported rare earths—UT Dallas' motor completely eliminates the use of rare earth materials. Additionally, the motor contains two stators. The stator is the stationary part of the motor that uses electromagnetism to help its rotor spin and generate power. The double-stator design has the potential to generate very high…


Status: ALUMNI
State: OK
Project Term: -
Program: FOCUS

University of Tulsa

Enabling Energy Conversion and Storage with Light-Filtering Mirror

The University of Tulsa is developing a hybrid solar converter with a specialized light-filtering mirror that splits sunlight by wavelength, allowing part of the sunlight spectrum to be converted directly to electricity with photovoltaics (PV), while the rest is captured and stored as heat. By integrating a light-filtering mirror that passes the visible part of the spectrum to a PV cell, the system captures and converts as much as possible of the photons into high-value electricity and concentrates the remaining light onto a thermal fluid, which can be stored and be used as needed. University…


Status: ALUMNI
State: OK
Project Term: -
Program: FOCUS

University of Tulsa

Liquid Filter with Plasmonic Nanoparticles

The University of Tulsa is developing a hybrid solar converter that captures ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths of light in a thermal fluid while directing visible wavelengths of light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell to produce electricity. The PV cells can be kept at moderate temperatures while high-quality heat is captured in the thermal fluid for storage and conversion into electricity when needed. The thermal fluid will flow behind the PV cell to capture waste heat and then flow in front of the PV cell, where it heats further and also act as a filter, passing only the portions of sunlight…


Status: ALUMNI
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

University of Utah

Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery

The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team's innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project…


Status: ALUMNI
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: METALS

University of Utah

Direct Titanium Production from Titanium Slag

The University of Utah is developing a reactor that dramatically simplifies titanium production compared to conventional processes. Today's production processes are expensive and inefficient because they require several high-energy melting steps to separate titanium from its ores. The University of Utah's reactor utilizes a magnesium hydride solution as a reducing agent to break less expensive titanium ore into its components in a single step. By processing low-grade ore directly, the titanium can be chemically isolated from other impurities. This design eliminates the series of complex, high…


Status: ALUMNI
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: METALS

University of Utah

Electromagnetic Light Metal Sorting

The University of Utah is developing a light metal sorting system that can distinguish multiple grades of scrap metal using an adjustable and varying magnetic field. Current sorting technologies based on permanent magnets can only separate light metals from iron-based metals and tend to be inefficient and expensive. The University of Utah’s sorting technology utilizes an adjustable magnetic field rather than a permanent magnet to automate scrap sorting, which could offer increased accuracy, less energy consumption, lower CO2 emissions, and reduced costs. Due to the flexibility of this design…


Status: ACTIVE
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

University of Utah

Ultra-Low Power Sensor Network

The University of Utah will develop ultra-low power sensors engineered to passively detect specific volatile emissions, and enable the early detection of invasive weeds and/or insects in biofuel crop production. Farmers currently lose about 40% of crops due to weeds and insects that ideally need to be removed within a week of detection to prevent significant damage. Earlier detection could minimize such losses, and enable decreased applications of pesticides and herbicides, significantly increasing the overall energy efficiency of crop production and economic viability of energy biomass…


Status: ACTIVE
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

University of Utah

Self-Sustaining Cementitious Systems in Roman Reactive Glass Concretes

Develop extremely durable concretes with engineered foam glass aggregates that mimic the reactive volcanic glass of 2000-year-old Roman architectural and marine concretes. These innovative materials, mixtures and processing technologies, could improve durability at 4 times typical 50-year Portland cement concrete service life and reduce by up to 85% the energy and emissions associated with production and deployment.


Status: ACTIVE
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: SMARTFARM

University of Utah

Soil Organic Carbon Networked Measurement System (SOCNET)

The University of Utah aims to develop and deploy a distributed carbon sensor system that is buried into the soil, capable of locally stimulating a surrounding volume of soils at multiple depths, and sensing carbon and carbon flux at ultra-low operational cost. The sensors will enable high-accuracy and real-time decision data for cost-effective carbon removal, storage, and management to promote climate change mitigation via agriculture and managed land systems. The team aims to develop (1) a UV-based non-destructive CO2 sampling technique, (2) low-cost, wideband, and high-selectivity CO2…


Status: ACTIVE
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: ULTIMATE


Status: ACTIVE
State: VT
Project Term: -
Program: NODES

University of Vermont (UVM)

Packetized Energy Management

The University of Vermont (UVM) will develop and test a new approach for demand-side management called packetized energy management (PEM) that builds on approaches used to manage data packets in communication networks without centralized control and with a high level of privacy. The PEM system will allow millions of small end-use devices to cooperatively balance energy supply and demand in real time without jeopardizing the reliability of the grid or the quality of service to consumers. The project will develop the PEM method to optimally manage the rapid fluctuations that come with large…


Status: ACTIVE
State: VA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015

University of Virginia (UVA)

Ultra-Large Wind Turbine

The team led by the University of Virginia (UVA) will design the world’s largest wind turbine by employing a new downwind turbine concept called Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor (SUMR). Increasing the size of wind turbine blades will enable a large increase in power from today’s largest turbines – from an average of 5-10MW to a proposed 50MW system. The SUMR concept allows blades to deflect in the wind, much like a palm tree, to accommodate a wide range of wind speeds (up to hurricane-wind speeds) with reduced blade load, thus reducing rotor mass and fatigue. The novel blades also use…


Status: ACTIVE
State: VA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

University of Virginia (UVA)

Reinventing CEMENT: Carbonation-Enabled Mineralization to Engender Novel Technology

The University of Virginia (U.Va.), in collaboration with C-Crete Technologies, is developing a new approach for making cement by leveraging the ways in which certain mineral silicates react with carbon dioxide and water. These reactions produce mineral phases that are much stronger and more stable than commercial cements, thereby reducing CO2 emissions and energy use over time. Chemically, the products of these reactions share more in common with ancient Roman cements than they do with OPC. Because of the temperatures and pressures required to make these materials, the project will initially…


Status: ALUMNI
State: WA
Project Term: -
Program: ALPHA

University of Washington (UW)

Flow Z-Pinch for Fusion

The University of Washington (UW), along with its partner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will work to mitigate instabilities in the plasma, and thus provide more time to heat and compress it while minimizing energy loss. The team will use the Z-Pinch approach for simultaneously heating, confining, and compressing plasma by applying an intense, pulsed electrical current which generates a magnetic field. While the simplicity of the Z-Pinch is attractive, it has been plagued by plasma instabilities. UW will investigate Z-pinch fusion using sheared-flow stabilized plasmas, meaning that…


Status: ALUMNI
State: WA
Project Term: -
Program: AMPED

University of Washington (UW)

Optimal Battery Management System

University of Washington (UW) is developing a predictive battery management system that uses innovative modeling software to manage how batteries are charged and discharged, helping to optimize battery use. A significant problem with today's battery packs is their lack of internal monitoring capabilities, which interferes with our ability to identify and manage performance issues as they arise. UW's system would predict the physical states internal to batteries quickly and accurately enough for the data to be used in making decisions about how to control the battery to optimize its output and…