Displaying 151 - 200 of 1226

Status: ALUMNI
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: FOCUS
Award: $1,003,329

Cogenra Solar

Hybrid Solar Converter with Light-Filtering Mirror

Cogenra Solar is developing a hybrid solar converter with a specialized light-filtering mirror that splits sunlight by wavelength, allowing part of the sunlight spectrum to be converted directly to electricity with photovoltaics (PV), while the rest is captured and stored as heat. By integrating a light-filtering mirror that passes the visible part of the spectrum to a PV cell, the system captures and converts as much as possible of the photons into high-value electricity and concentrates the remaining light onto a thermal fluid, which can be stored and be used as needed. Cogenra’s hybrid…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $500,000

Colorado School of Mines

Thermoelectric Materials Discovery

The Colorado School of Mines will develop a new method for the high-throughput discovery and screening of thermoelectric materials. The objective is to develop a new class of thermoelectric materials that can enable heat-to-electricity efficiencies greater than 20%. Aerosol spray deposition will be used to collect particles on the solid surfaces, allowing high throughput synthesis with finely tuned composition control. To achieve the thermoelectric performance desired, a tight feedback loop between synthesis, characterization, and theory will be employed to actively guide the design of…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $500,000

Colorado School of Mines

Ammonia Synthesis Membrane Reactor

The Colorado School of Mines will develop a membrane reactor concept to synthesize ammonia at ambient pressure. In traditional ammonia production processes, nitrogen (N2) and hydrogen (H2) compete for identical catalyst sites, and the presence of each inhibits the other, with the overall rate reflecting a compromise. The team proposes decoupling and independently controlling the N2 and H2 dissociation by dedicating one side of the composite membrane to each. In this way, the catalysts may be individually optimized. Highly effective catalysts have been previously demonstrated for H2…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: INTEGRATE
Award: $10,801,864

Colorado School of Mines

High Efficiency, Low Cost & Robust Hybrid SOFC/IC Engine Power Generator

The Colorado School of Mines (Mines) will develop a hybrid power generation system that leverages a pressurized, intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack and an advanced low-energy-content fuel internal combustion engine. In Phase II, the team will develop and test three SOFC sub-module building blocks (CERES Power and Mines) and then integrate them into a 100 kW-capable pressure vessel package, and develop efficiency-enhanced 2nd generation Kohler engine and balance-of-plant hardware, including novel, positive displacement rotating machinery from Air Squared; build a full-…


Status: CANCELLED
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: IONICS
Award: $1,420,645

Colorado School of Mines

Hybrid Polyoxometalate Membranes

The Colorado School of Mines will develop a new membrane for redox flow battery systems based on novel, low-cost materials. The membrane is a hybrid polymer that includes heteropoly acid molecules and a special purpose fluorocarbon-based synthetic rubber called a fluoroelastomer. The team will enhance the membrane's selectivity by refining the polymer structure, employing crosslinking techniques, and also through doping the polymer with cesium. The fluoroelastmer is commercially available, thereby contributing to a superior performance-to-cost ratio for the membrane. Flow battery experts…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018
Award: $2,047,676

Colorado School of Mines

Efficient Hydrogen and Ammonia Production via Process Intensification and Integration

The Colorado School of Mines will develop a more efficient method for both the conversion of hydrogen and nitrogen to ammonia and the generation of high purity hydrogen from ammonia for fuel cell fueling stations. Composed of 17.6% hydrogen by mass, ammonia also has potential as a hydrogen carrier and carbon-free fuel. The team will develop a new technology to generate fuel cell-quality hydrogen from ammonia using a membrane based reactor. In addition, similar catalytic membrane reactor technology will be developed for synthesis of ammonia from nitrogen and hydrogen at reduced pressure and…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: REBELS
Award: $3,997,457

Colorado School of Mines

Fuel-Flexible Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell Stack

The Colorado School of Mines is developing a mixed proton and oxygen ion conducting electrolyte that will allow a fuel cell to operate at temperatures less than 500°C. By using a proton and oxygen ion electrolyte, the fuel cell stack is able to reduce coking – which clogs anodes with carbon deposits – and enhance the process of turning hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen. Today’s ceramic fuel cells are based on oxygen-ion conducting electrolytes and operate at high temperatures. Mines’ advanced mixed proton and oxygen-ion conducting fuel cells will operate on lower temperatures, and have the…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: GAMOW
Award: $1,397,973

Colorado School of Mines

Interfacial-Engineered Membranes for Efficient Tritium Extraction

One of the biggest challenges facing the practical deployment of fusion energy-based power is the effective management of tritium resources. Tritium, an isotope of hydrogen with a short half-life, is a fusion fuel and must be continuously generated, recovered, and recycled in any tritium-fueled fusion power plant. Currently, scalable tritium extraction and pumping technologies do not exist. Colorado School of Mines will develop and demonstrate engineered composite membranes for efficient tritium extraction from breeder media and the vessel exhaust. These membranes will be engineered for high…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: ARID
Award: $2,087,586

Colorado State University (CSU)

Ultra-Efficient Turbo-Compression Cooling

Colorado State University (CSU) and its partners, Modine and Barber-Nichols, will develop a thermally powered supplemental cooling system for thermoelectric power plants that will enable dry cooling. The technology features a transformational turbo-compressor and low-cost, high-performance heat exchangers that are currently mass produced for the HVAC industry. To operate, low-grade waste heat from the power plant combustion exhaust gases, or flue gas, is captured and used to power a highly efficient turbo-compressor system. The compressor pressurizes vapor in a refrigeration cycle to remove…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: MONITOR
Award: $4,441,314

Colorado State University (CSU)

MONITOR Field Test Site

The team, led by Colorado State University (CSU), will develop a test site facility near Fort Collins, CO where ARPA-E can evaluate the methane sensing technologies of the MONITOR project teams, as required by the MONITOR FOA. The CSU team will design, construct, and operate a natural gas testing facility that can determine whether MONITOR technologies have met or exceeded the technical performance targets set forth by the MONITOR program. The test facility will be designed to realistically mimic the layout of a broad range of natural gas facilities and equipment. The test facility will…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012
Award: $1,576,999

Colorado State University (CSU)

More Options for Bioenergy Crops

Colorado State University (CSU) is developing technology to rapidly introduce novel traits into crops that currently cannot be readily engineered. Presently, a limited number of crops can be engineered, and the processes are not standardized – restricting the agricultural sources for engineered biofuel production. More—and more diverse—biofuel crops could substantially improve the efficiency, time scale, and geographic range of biofuel production. CSU’s approach would enable simple and efficient engineering of a broad range of bioenergy crops using synthetic biology tools to standardize their…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015
Award: $499,999

Colorado State University (CSU)

Paintable Heat-Reflective Coatings for Low-Cost Energy Efficient Windows

Colorado State University (CSU) will work with BASF and Cypris Materials to accelerate the technology first developed under a 2015 ARPA‐E OPEN award. They will transition the developed coating into an industrially scalable, sprayable process to retrofit energy inefficient windows with a heat-reflective, visibly transparent film. Under the original award, nanostructured coatings were shown to greatly improve the efficiency of single‐pane windows by lowering solar heat gain. The current team aims to further improve the coating technology and decrease installation costs to 1/10 of current high‐…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015
Award: $5,205,217

Colorado State University (CSU)

Heat-Reflective Window Coating

Colorado State University (CSU) and its partners are developing an inexpensive, polymer-based, energy-saving material that can be applied to windows as a retrofit. The team will develop a coating consisting of polymers that can rapidly self-assemble into orderly layers that will reflect infrared wavelengths but pass visible light. As such, the coating will help reduce building cooling requirements and energy use without darkening the room. The polymers can be applied as a paint, meaning that deployment could be faster, less expensive, and more widespread because homeowners can apply the…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: ROOTS
Award: $8,192,319

Colorado State University (CSU)

Root Genetics for Drought and Carbon Adaptation

Colorado State University (CSU) will develop a high-throughput ground-based robotic platform that will characterize a plant’s root system and the surrounding soil chemistry to better understand how plants cycle carbon and nitrogen in soil. CSU’s robotic platform will use a suite of sensor technologies to investigate crop genetic-environment interaction and generate data to improve models of chemical cycling of soil carbon and nitrogen in agricultural environments. The platform will collect information on root structure and depth, and deploy a novel spectroscopic technology to quantify levels…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: FLECCS
Award: $1,100,000

Colorado State University (CSU)

Synergistic Heat Pumped Thermal Storage and Flexible Carbon Capture System

Colorado State University and its partners—ION Clean Energy, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and Bright Generation Holdings—will develop a thermal energy storage system with flexible advanced solvent carbon capture technology. The system aims to decrease the levelized cost of electricity for natural gas-fired combined cycle (NGCC) power plants to <75 $/MWh while simultaneously capturing >95% of CO2 emissions when operating in highly VRE penetration markets. The team's approach uses a novel and low-cost heat-pump thermal storage system. This system enables load shifting and NGCC…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CO
Project Term: -
Program: REMEDY
Award: $1,500,000

Colorado State University (CSU)

Lean-burn Natural Gas Engine System to Achieve Near-zero Crankcase Methane Emissions from Existing and Future Engine Fleet

Colorado State University (CSU) and Caterpillar will develop technology to reduce methane emissions from lean-burn natural gas engines by reducing methane ventilation through the crankcase, the engine base that contains the crankshaft and integrates other engine components. Methane that leaks past the ring and valve seals during compression and combustion enters the crankcase and is usually vented to the atmosphere. The team proposes a system that would capture the crankcase methane, treat it, and reroute it back to the engine intake where it would be re-ingested and combusted. This would…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: Electrofuels
Award: $1,505,985

Columbia University

Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2

Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammonia—an abundant and affordable chemical—and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the system—creating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: ENLITENED
Award: $10,399,999

Columbia University

Integrated Photonic Networks

Columbia University will develop a new datacenter architecture co-designed with state-of-the-art silicon photonic technologies to reduce system-wide energy consumption. The team’s approach will improve data movement between processor/memory and will optimize resource allocation throughout the network to minimize idle times and wasted energy. Data transfer in datacenters occurs over a series of interconnects that link different server racks of the datacenter together. Networks in modern mega-scale datacenters are becoming increasingly complicated. One by-product of this complexity is that on…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $500,000

Columbia University

Integrated Power Adapter

The Columbia University team is developing a proof-of-concept solid-state solution to generate electricity from high-temperature waste heat (~900 K) using thermal radiation between a hot object placed in extreme proximity (<100 nm) to a cooler photovoltaic (PV) cell. In this geometry, thermal radiation can be engineered such that its spectrum is quasi-monochromatic and aligned with the PV cell’s bandgap frequency. In this case, it is estimated that electricity can be generated with a conversion efficiency beyond 25% and with a power density that could greatly outperform currently available…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $500,000

Columbia University

Computing Through Silicon Photonics

Columbia University will develop a new platform for generating multiple simultaneous optical channels (wavelengths) with low power dissipation, thereby enabling optical interconnects for low power computing. Optical interconnect links communicate using optical fibers that carry light. Wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) is a technology that combines a number of optical carrier signals on a single optical fiber by using different wavelengths. This technique enables bidirectional communications over strands of fiber, dramatically increasing capacity. Low-power lasers generate the wavelengths…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $475,221

Columbia University

Co-Generation of Fuels During Copper Bioleaching

The innovation lies in the exploitation of novel natural energy source: reduced metal deposits. The energy released during oxidation of these metals could be used to reduce CO2 into fuels and chemicals reducing petroleum usage.This proposed project fits within the Chemical-Chemical Area of Interest, as it involves the coupling of the oxidation of reduced minerals in the Earth’s crust to the production of reduced carbon chemicals for fuel utilization. This addresses both of Mission Areas of ARPA-E as the co-generation of fuels during copper bioleaching will potentially reduce the import of…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: IMPACCT
Award: $1,254,752

Columbia University

Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization

Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonate—this process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: SWITCHES
Award: $3,725,000

Columbia University

Spalling GaN Transistors

Columbia University will create high-performance, low-cost, vertical gallium nitride (GaN) devices using a technique called spalling, which involves exfoliating a working circuit and transferring it to another material. Columbia and its project partners will spall and bond entire transistors from high-performance GaN wafers to lower cost silicon substrates. Substrates are thin wafers of semiconducting material needed to power devices like transistors and integrated circuits. GaN substrates operate much more efficiently than silicon substrates, particularly at high voltages, but the high cost…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: PERFORM
Award: $2,061,355

Columbia University

Risk-Aware Power System Control, Dispatch and Market Incentives

The power industry sees risk as statistically independent of today's operational practices and regulations. The challenge is convincing the industry to proactively and explicitly study, quantify, price, and incorporate risk into dispatch and response algorithms. Columbia University will develop a risk dashboard to address this challenge that will enable independent system operators (ISOs) of the electrical grid to compute and analyze engineering and financial risks occurring on operational time scales ranging from several minutes to days. This dashboard will facilitate efficient and…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: Exploratory Topics
Award: $1,000,000

Columbia University

Development of Biological and Electrochemical Technologies for the Clean Extraction of Copper and Critical Materials from Low Grade Ores

Columbia University will develop a novel hydrometallurgical platform that will exploit the electrochemical reduction of copper ores followed by biological leaching of sulfide minerals to recover copper metal. The team’s new platform technology will enable the processing of domestic low-grade copper concentrates with high pyrite concentrations. This will reduce the outsourcing of copper processing to overseas smelters and enable new domestic sources of low-grade copper concentrate to be processed economically. The bacteria involved in the bioleaching process will be genetically modified for…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: Exploratory Topics
Award: $400,000

Columbia University

Integrated CO2-facilitated Hydrometallurgical and Electrochemical Technology for Sustainable Mining and Recovery of Critical Elements from Wastes and Ashes

Critical minerals—used in important defense and energy applications–are scarce. Municipal wastes are excellent candidates for domestic sources of high-grade ores due to their high metal concentration. Because the metals in wastes and waste ashes contain a wide range of impurities, however, conventional extraction processes are not effective. Columbia University will develop an innovative MIDAS process based on the integrated CO2-facilitated hydrometallurgical and electrochemical technology. The team will (1) develop supercritical CO2-based solvent systems for hydrometallurgical extraction of…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: DAYS
Award: $3,379,111

Columbia University

Minimally Orchestrated Storage Technology for Duration Addition to Electricity Storage

Columbia University's Electrochemical Energy Center will develop a long-duration grid energy storage solution that leverages a new approach to the zinc bromine battery, a popular chemistry for flow batteries. Taking advantage of the way zinc and bromine behave in the cell, the battery will eliminate the need for a separator to keep the reactants apart when charged, as well as allow all the electrolyte to be stored in a single tank, instead of multiple cells. This reduction in “balance of plant” hardware will reduce system cost.


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2021
Award: $1,498,533

Columbia University

Lithium Ion Bobbin Cells for Grid Scale Energy Storage

More information on this project is coming soon!


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2021
Award: $3,375,712


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: BETHE
Award: $1,374,368

Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS)

Pulsed High Temperature Superconducting Central Solenoid For Revolutionizing Tokamaks

The tokamak is the most scientifically mature fusion energy concept, which confines hot plasma in the shape of a torus (similar to a donut). This plasma is controlled in part by a central solenoid electromagnet. Using high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and an innovative design, Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) and its partners aim to build a central solenoid capable of quickly changing (“fast ramping”) its current and magnetic field, while also being robust enough to survive many thousands of cycles. This new HTS magnet will enable a new mode of tokamak operation, in which power output…


Status: ACTIVE
State: PA
Project Term: -
Program: Exploratory Topics
Award: $499,999

Community Energy

Chemically Engineered Process for Enhanced Carbon Mineralization Potential

Carbon mineralization, a promising carbon management technology, reacts CO2 gas with minerals containing magnesium and/or calcium. The reaction forms a stable, solid carbonate, which can be used in building materials. Community Energy will use minerals from the waste produced at mining facilities to enhance the rate of carbon mineralization, increase the amount of available minerals used to capture CO2, and produce building materials, such as aggregate for making cement, which can offset some of the carbon footprint associated with the cement industry.


Status: CANCELLED
State: WI
Project Term: -
Program: HITEMMP
Award: $1,455,000

CompRex

Compact Heat Exchanger for High Temperature High Pressure Applications Using Advanced Cermet

CompRex aims to transform heat exchange technology for high temperature (>800°C or 1472°F) and high pressure (80 bar or 1160 psi) applications through the use of advanced metal and ceramic composite material, development of a new simplified manufacturing approach, and optimization of heat exchanger design based on the new material and manufacturing process. This solution could not only satisfy the performance requirements of next generation power cycles but also significantly lower costs of production and scale-up by as much as 40% compared with existing state-of-the-art heat exchangers.…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2021
Award: $3,579,478


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: DELTA
Award: $2,996,807

Cornell University

Thermoregulatory Clothing System

Cornell University will develop thermoregulatory apparel that enables the expansion of the comfortable temperature range in buildings by more than 4°F in both heating and cooling seasons. Cornell’s thermoregulatory apparel integrates advanced textile technologies and state-of-the-art wearable electronics into a functional apparel design without compromising comfort, wearability, washability, appearance, or safety. The thermoregulatory clothing system senses the wearer’s skin temperature and activates a heated or cooled airflow around the individual, reducing the energy required to heat or…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: GENI
Award: $1,300,000

Cornell University

Cloud Computing for the Grid

Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud's data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing,…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $499,999

Cornell University

Secondary Lithium Metal Batteries

Cornell University will develop a new type of rechargeable lithium metal battery that provides superior performance over existing lithium-ion batteries. The anode, or negative side of a lithium-ion battery, is usually composed of a carbon-based material. In lithium metal batteries, the anode is made of metallic lithium. While using metallic lithium could result in double the storage capacity, lithium metal batteries have unreliable performance, safety issues, and premature cell failure. There are two major causes for this performance degradation. First, side reactions can occur between the…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012
Award: $908,937

Cornell University

Efficient Photobioreactor for Algae-Based Fuel

Cornell University is developing a new photobioreactor that is more efficient than conventional bioreactors at producing algae-based fuels. Traditional photobioreactors suffer from several limitations, particularly poor light distribution, inefficient fuel extraction, and the consumption of large amounts of water and energy. Cornell’s bioreactor is compact, making it more economical to grow engineered algae and collect the fuel the algae produces. Cornell’s bioreactor also delivers sunlight efficiently through low-cost, plastic, light-guiding sheets. By distributing optimal amounts of…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: SENSOR
Award: $1,500,000

Cornell University

Indoor Occupant Counting Based on RF Backscattering

Cornell University will develop an occupant monitoring system to enable more efficient control of HVAC systems in commercial buildings. The system is based on a combination of "active" radio frequency identification (RFID) readers and "passive" tags. Instead of requiring occupants to wear tags, the tags, as coordinated landmarks, will be distributed around a commercial area to enable an accurate occupancy count. When occupants, stationary or moving, are present among the RFID reader and multiple tags, their interference on the backscattering paths can be exploited to gain…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: SWITCHES
Award: $3,435,498

Cornell University

GaN Power Transistor

Cornell University will develop an innovative, high-efficiency, gallium nitride (GaN) power switch. Cornell’s design is significantly smaller and operates at much higher performance levels than conventional silicon power switches, making it ideal for use in a variety of power electronics applications. Cornell will also reuse expensive GaN materials and utilize conventional low-cost production methods to keep costs down.


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: Exploratory Topics
Award: $1,000,000

Cornell University

Engineered Microorganisms for Enhanced Rare Earth Element Bio-Mining and Separations

Cornell University will use advanced genomics, synthetic biology and microfluidic laboratory evolution devices to engineer two sets of exotic microbes to (1) extract REE from ores, spent cracking catalysts, coal ash and electronic waste, and (2) purify REE into single element batches. These two sets of engineered organisms will enable high-efficiency, high-selectivity extraction of REE from ore and end-of-life feedstocks, and purification of mixed REE into isolated element solutions, all under benign conditions without the need of harsh solvents and high temperatures. These new technologies…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NY
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2021
Award: $2,500,000


Status: CANCELLED
State: IL
Project Term: -
Program: REMOTE
Award: $0

Coskata

Methanol Fermentation in Clostridium Bacteria

Coskata is engineering methanol fermentation into an anaerobic microorganism to enable a low-cost biological approach for liquid fuel production. Currently, the most well-known processes available to convert methane into fuel are expensive and energy-intensive. Coskata is constructing strains of the anaerobic bacteria to efficiently and cost-effectively convert activated methane to butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as part of a fuel blend. Coskata’s process involves molecular genetics to introduce and control specific genes, and to inactivate undesired pathways, together with…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NH
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018
Award: $2,987,193

Creare

Closed-Loop 5-kWe Brayton-Cycle Microturbine with 38% Efficiency: Advanced Generator Technology Designed for Inexpensive Mass-Production

Creare, in partnership with IMBY Energy, is developing a mass-manufacturable, recuperated, closed-loop Brayton-cycle microturbine that will provide 5 kW of electrical power for residential and commercial buildings. The waste heat from the device can be harvested for heating. Technical innovations in the system that are anticipated to enable high efficiency at an attractive cost include a diffusion bonded foil recuperator, a turbomachine with specialized hydrodynamic gas bearings, a binary working fluid mixture and flameless combustion.


Status: ACTIVE
State: NH
Project Term: -
Program: Exploratory Topics
Award: $769,822

Creare

High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, Additive-Manufactured Air Contactor

Reducing the cost of CO2 removal from the air requires developing a new contactor, which captures CO2 so it can be recovered, concentrated, and stored. Creare aims to develop a contactor using Creare’s low-cost additive manufacturing methods. Creare will also incorporate a low-cost, durable sorbent that captures CO2 molecules from ambient air and releases CO2 for storage when heated to moderate temperatures. The contactor is designed for wind-driven operation, which reduces cost by eliminating the need for large arrays of fans to blow air through the system.


Status: ALUMNI
State: NC
Project Term: -
Program: ADEPT
Award: $5,999,973

Cree

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Power Transistors

Cree is developing silicon carbide (SiC) power transistors that are 50% more energy efficient than traditional transistors. Transistors act like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon semiconductors to conduct electricity. However, transistors with SiC semiconductors operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than their silicon counterparts. SiC-based transistors are also smaller and require less cooling than those made with traditional silicon power technology. Cree’s…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NC
Project Term: -
Program: Solar ADEPT
Award: $2,794,354

Cree

Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter

Cree is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels--eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers "step up" the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually "stepped down" to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the…


Status: CANCELLED
State: AR
Project Term: -
Program: CIRCUITS
Award: $1,910,463

Cree Fayetteville

Efficient 500kW DC Fast Charger

Cree Fayetteville (operating as Wolfspeed, A Cree Company) will team with Ford Motor Company and the University of Michigan-Dearborn to build a power converter for DC fast chargers for electric vehicles using a solid-state transformer based on silicon carbide. The team will construct a single-phase 500 kW building block for a DC fast charger that is at least four times the power density of todays installed units. This device would offer significant improvements in efficiency (greater than 60% less power losses), size/weight (greater than 75% smaller size, 85% less weight), and cost (40% lower…


Status: ALUMNI
State: AR
Project Term: -
Program: IDEAS
Award: $498,272

Cree Fayetteville

Diamond Capacitors for Power Electronics

Cree Fayetteville will develop high voltage (10kV), high energy density (30 J/cm3), high temperature (150 °C+) capacitors utilizing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond capable of powering the next generation of high-performance power electronics systems. CVD diamond is a superior material for capacitors due to its strong electrical, mechanical, and materials qualities that are inherently stable over varying temperatures. It also has similar qualities of single crystal diamond without the high cost. Commercial CVD diamond deposition will be utilized to prove the feasibility of the…


Status: ACTIVE
State: WA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018
Award: $3,415,797

CTFusion

HIT-TD: Plasma Driver Technology Demonstration for Economical Fusion Power Plants

CTFusion is developing an early-stage approach to a commercially viable fusion power plant. The company will pursue higher performance in a compact fusion configuration called a spheromak through targeted upgrades of an existing plasma system. The project aims to demonstrate the required physical parameters, engineering performance, and scalability of the team's fusion concept toward an eventual electricity-producing, economical fusion power plant. CTFusion plans to 1) provide an integrated demonstration of its novel plasma sustainment method called imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) and…


Status: ALUMNI
State: IN
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2015
Award: $2,073,235

Cummins Corporate Research & Technology

High-Efficiency Engines

Cummins Corporate Research & Technology will develop an advanced high efficiency natural gas-fueled internal combustion engine for high-power distributed electricity generation. The team is seeking to achieve 55% brake thermal efficiency while maintaining low exhaust emissions. The enabling technology is wet compression, where fine droplets of water are sprayed directly into the engine cylinders, causing the charge temperature to drop and thereby prevent the onset of damaging engine knock at high compression ratios. Since it takes less energy to compress cooler air, the savings from…