Displaying 351 - 400 of 945

Status: ALUMNI
State: NE
Project Term: -
Program: MONITOR

LI-COR Biosciences

Optical Sensors for Methane Detection

LI-COR Biosciences is working with Colorado State University (CSU) and Gener8 to develop cost-effective, highly sensitive optical methane sensors that can be integrated into mobile or stationary methane monitoring systems. Their laser-based sensor utilizes optical cavity techniques, which provide long path lengths and high methane sensitivity and selectivity, but previously have been costly. The team will employ a novel sensor design developed in parallel with advanced manufacturing techniques to enable a substantial cost reduction. The sensors are expected to provide exceptional long-term…


Status: ALUMNI
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: ALPHA

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Plasma Liners For Fusion

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), along with HyperV Technologies and other partners, will design and build a new driver technology that is non-destructive, allowing for more rapid experimentation and progress toward economical fusion power. The team will use a spherical array of plasma guns to produce supersonic jets that merge to create an imploding plasma liner. Because the guns are located several meters away from the fusion burn region (i.e., they constitute a “standoff driver”), the reactor components should not be damaged by repeated experiments. This will allow the team to perform…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: BETHE

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Electromagnetic and Particle Diagnostics for Transformative Fusion-Energy Concepts

Los Alamos National Laboratory and its partner, the University of Nevada-Reno, will provide visible spectroscopy and soft x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the performance of a number of lower-cost, potentially transformative fusion-energy concepts. Multi-chord visible spectroscopy measurements will enable the identification of impurities and their spatial and temporal variation in the plasmas, which is essential for understanding plasma composition and plasma conditions. A state-of-the-art, solid-state X-ray imager, the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD), will be used…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: BETHE

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Target Formation and Integrated Experiments for Plasma-Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will lead a team that will test an innovative approach to controlled fusion energy production: plasma-jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF). PJMIF uses a spherical array of plasma guns to produce an imploding supersonic plasma shell, or “liner,” which inertially compresses and heats a pre-injected magnetized plasma “target” in a bid to access the conditions for thermonuclear fusion. LANL will develop a magnetized target plasma for the approach at a smaller scale than would be needed for a reactor. The team will perform first integrated liner-on-…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Stable Diacid Coordinated Quaternary Ammonium Polymers for 80-150°C Fuel Cells

Los Alamos National Laboratory will develop proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells for light-duty vehicles that operate on hydrogen or dimethyl ether (DME) fuel in the temperature range of 80-230°C (176-446°F) without first warming or humidifying the incoming fuel stream. The team’s concept uses a new polymer-based PEM that will provide high conductivity across a wide temperature range and can operate without humidification, simplifying the system components necessary to keep the cell running effectively, streamlining design, and reducing system size and costs, which are crucial for light…


Status: ACTIVE
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Advanced Manufacturing of Embedded Heat Pipe Nuclear Hybrid Reactor

Los Alamos National Laboratory will develop a scalable, compact, high-temperature, heat pipe reactor (HPR) to provide heat and electricity to remote areas. A 15MWth HPR could be built on-site in less than a month and self-regulate its power to plug into microgrids. The team will use high temperature materials via advanced manufacturing to reduce costs, and further cost reduction will be achieved from novel sensors embedded in the reactor core for continuous monitoring, reducing the number of operational staff needed.


Status: ACTIVE
State: NM
Project Term: -
Program: Special Projects

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

Portable Neutron and Soft X-ray diagnostics for Transformative Fusion-Energy Concepts

Develop a portable suite of proven, absolutely calibrated neutron and soft x-ray diagnostics to characterize the performance of a number of fusion energy concepts. The tool will be able to determine neutron yields as low as 105 neutrons per pulse, identify hot regions and structures in the plasma, and make estimates of the core plasma electron temperature.


Status: ALUMNI
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: ALPHA

Magneto-Inertial Fusion Technologies, Inc. (MIFTI)

Staged Z-Pinch Target For Fusion

MIFTI is developing a new version of the Staged Z-Pinch (SZP) fusion concept that reduces instabilities in the fusion plasma, allowing the plasma to persist for longer periods of time. The Z-Pinch is an approach for simultaneously heating, confining, and compressing plasma by applying an intense, pulsed electrical current which generates a magnetic field. While the simplicity of the Z-Pinch is attractive, it has been plagued by plasma instabilities. MIFTI’s SZP plasma target consists of two components with different atomic numbers and is specifically configured to reduce instabilities. When…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: GENSETS

MAHLE Powertrain

Advanced Lean Burn Micro-CHP Genset

MAHLE Powertrain with partners at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Louthan Engineering, Kohler Company, and Intellichoice Energy will design and develop a CHP generator that uses an internal combustion engine with a turbulent jet ignition (TJI) combustion system. Similar to an automotive internal combustion engine, the proposed system follows the same process: the combustion of natural gas fuel creates a force that moves a piston, transferring chemical energy to mechanical energy used in conjunction with a generator to create electricity. The TJI combustion system incorporates a pre-chamber…


Status: ACTIVE
State: HI
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

Makai Ocean Engineering

Performance and Impact of Macroalgae Farming

Makai Ocean Engineering will lead a MARINER Category 3 project to develop tools to simulate the biological and structural performance of offshore macroalgae systems. Macroalgae farming systems will require significant capital and operating costs. Investment and management decisions can be guided by the development of advanced modeling tools to help better understand the nature of macroalgae production for profitable operation. Makai's project will result in a hydrodynamic-mechanical model which simulates forces on offshore algae structures from to waves and currents.…


Status: ALUMNI
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2009

Makani Power

Airborne Wind Turbine

Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land,…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

Marine BioEnergy

Biofuel Production from Kelp

The team led by Marine BioEnergy will develop an open ocean cultivation system for macroalgae biomass, which can be converted to biocrude. Giant kelp is one of the fastest growing sources of biomass, and the open ocean surface water is an immense, untapped region for growing kelp. However, kelp does not grow in the open ocean because it needs to attach to a hard surface, typically less than 40 meters deep. Kelp also needs nutrients that are only available in deep water or near shore but not on the surface of the open ocean. To overcome these obstacles, the team proposes to build inexpensive…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: MARINER

Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL)

Techniques for Tropical Seaweed Cultivation

The Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), located at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, will lead a MARINER Category 1 project to design and develop a cultivation system for the tropical seaweed Eucheuma isiforme to produce biomass for biofuels. Eucheuma is a commercially valuable species of “red” macroalgae, primarily cultivated in Asia, which has been difficult to propagate in a cost-effective manner. Cultivation of Eucheuma is labor intensive — making up almost 70% of the production costs — and is limited to easily accessible areas near shore. The MBL team will design and…


Status: ACTIVE
State: WI
Project Term: -
Program: BREAKERS

Marquette University

Ultra Fast Resonant DC Breaker

Marquette University will leverage the technology gap presented by the lack of DC breaker technology. The project objective is to create an industry standard DC breaker that is compact, efficient, ultra-fast, lightweight, resilient, and scalable. The proposed solution will use a novel current source to force a zero current in the main current conduction path, providing a soft transition when turning on the DC breaker. A state-of-the-art actuator that can produce significantly more force than current solutions will also be used. The approach represents a transformational DC breaker scalable…


Status: ACTIVE
State: WI
Project Term: -
Program: CIRCUITS

Marquette University

AC-to-DC Ultra-Fast EV Charger

Marquette University will develop a small, compact, lightweight, and efficient 1 MW battery charger for electric vehicles that will double the specific power and triple power density compared to the current state-of-the-art. The team aims to use MOSFET switches based on silicon carbide to ensure the device runs efficiently while handling very large amounts of power in a small package. If successful, the device could help to dramatically reduce charging times for electric vehicles to a matter of minutes - promoting faster adoption of electric vehicles with longer range, greater energy…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: ADEPT

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Advanced Power Electronics for LED Drivers

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is teaming with Georgia Institute of Technology, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania to create more efficient power circuits for energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through advances in 3 related areas. First, the team is using semiconductors made of high-performing gallium nitride grown on a low-cost silicon base (GaN-on-Si). These GaN-on-Si semiconductors conduct electricity more efficiently than traditional silicon semiconductors. Second, the team is developing new magnetic materials and structures to reduce the size…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: DIFFERENTIATE

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Machine Learning Assisted Models for Understanding and Optimizing Boiling Heat Transfer on Scalable Random Surfaces

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will develop a machine learning (ML) approach to optimize surfaces for boiling heat transfer and improve energy efficiency for applications ranging from nuclear power plants to industrial process steam generation. Predicting and enhancing boiling heat transfer presently relies on empirical correlations and experimental observations. MIT’s technology will use supervised ML models to identify important features and designs that contribute to heat transfer enhancement autonomously. If successful, MIT’s designs will lead to more readily adopted…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: DIFFERENTIATE

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Global Optimization of Multicomponent Oxide Catalysts for OER/ORR

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will develop machine learning (ML) enhanced tools to accelerate the development of catalysts that promote the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) or the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). These reactions are critical to the cost-effective generation (OER) or oxidation (ORR) of hydrogen. Available catalysts for promoting these reactions include scarce and costly precious metals like platinum. Hence, their practical applications are limited by high cost and low abundance in addition to moderate stability. The MIT team will tailor the chemical…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: Electrofuels

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Liquid Fuel from Bacteria

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: Electrofuels

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: ENLITENED

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Seamless Interconnect Networks

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will develop a unified optical communication technology for use in datacenter optical interconnects. Compared to existing interconnect solutions, the proposed approach exhibits high energy efficiency and large bandwidth density, as well as a low-cost packaging design. Specifically, the team aims to develop novel photonic material, device, and heterogeneously integrated interconnection technologies that are scalable across chip-, board-, and rack-interconnect hierarchy levels. The MIT design uses an optical bridge to connect silicon…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: FOCUS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Stacked Hybrid Solar Converter

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is developing a hybrid solar converter that integrates a thermal absorber and solar cells into a layered stack, allowing some portions of sunlight to be converted directly to electricity and the rest to be stored as heat for conversion when needed most. MIT’s design focuses concentrated sunlight onto metal fins coated with layers that reflect a portion of the sunlight while absorbing the rest. The absorbed light is converted to heat and stored in a thermal fluid for conversion to mechanical energy by a heat engine. The reflected light is directed to…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: FOCUS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Low-Cost Hetero-Epitaxial Solar Cell for Hybrid Converter

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is developing a high-efficiency solar cell grown on a low-cost silicon wafer, which incorporates a micro-scale heat management system. The team will employ a novel fabrication process to ensure compatibility between the indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) solar cell and an inexpensive silicon wafer template, which will reduce cell costs. MIT will also develop a color-selective filter, designed to split incoming concentrated sunlight into two components. One component will be sent to the solar cells and immediately converted into electricity and the…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device

MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel's photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT's…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Efficient Heat Storage Materials

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun's not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: HEATS

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is developing a low-cost, compact, high-capacity, advanced thermo-adsorptive battery (ATB) for effective climate control of EVs. The ATB provides both heating and cooling by taking advantage of the materials' ability to adsorb a significant amount of water. This efficient battery system design could offer up as much as a 30% increase in driving range compared to current EV climate control technology. The ATB provides high-capacity thermal storage with little-to-no electrical power consumption. MIT is also looking to explore the possibility of…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: HITEMMP

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Multiscale Porous High-Temperature Heat Exchanger Using Ceramic Co-Extrusion

MIT will develop a high performance, compact, and durable ceramic heat exchanger. The multiscale porous high temperature heat exchanger will be capable of operation at temperatures over 1200°C (2192°F) and pressures above 80 bar (1160 psi). Porosity at the centimeter-scale will serve as channels for the flow of working fluids. A micrometer-scale porous core will be embedded into these channels. A ceramic co-extrusion process will create the channels and core using silicon carbide (SiC). This core design will significantly improve heat transfer and structural strength and minimize pressure…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: IMPACCT

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

CO2 Capture Using Electrical Energy

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Siemens Corporation are developing a process to separate CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants by using electrical energy to chemically activate and deactivate sorbents—materials that absorb gases. The team found that certain sorbents bond to CO2 when they are activated by electrical energy and then transported through a specialized separator that deactivates the molecule and releases it for storage. This method directly uses the electricity from the power plant, which is a more efficient but more expensive form of energy than heat,…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: MOSAIC

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Integrated Micro-Optical Concentrator Photovoltaics

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with partner Arizona State University will develop a new concept for PV power generation that achieves the 30% conversion efficiency associated with traditional concentrated PV systems while maintaining the low cost, low profile, and lightweight of conventional FPV modules. MIT aims to combine three technologies to achieve their goals: a dispersive lens system, laterally arrayed multiple bandgap (LAMB) solar cells, and a low-cost power management system. The dispersive lens concentrates and separates light that passes through it, providing 400-…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: MOSAIC

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Wafer-Level Integrated Concentrating Photovoltaics

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with partner Sandia National Laboratories will develop a micro-CPV system. The team’s approach integrates optical concentrating elements with micro-scale solar cells to enhance efficiency, reduce material and fabrication costs, and significantly reduce system size. The team’s key innovation is the use of traditional silicon PV cells for more than one function. These traditional cells lay on a silicon substrate that has etched reflective cavities with high-performance micro-PV cells on the cavity floor. Light entering the system will hit a…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2009

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Electroville: Grid-Scale Batteries

Led by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Donald Sadoway, the Electroville project team is creating a community-scale electricity storage device using new materials and a battery design inspired by the aluminum production process known as smelting. A conventional battery includes a liquid electrolyte and a solid separator between its 2 solid electrodes. MIT's battery contains liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt electrolyte. Because metals and salt don't mix, these 3 liquids of different densities naturally separate into layers, eliminating the need for a solid…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2012

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Scalable, Low-Power Water Treatment System

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is developing a water treatment system to treat contaminated water from hydraulic fracking and seawater. There is a critical need for small to medium-sized, low-powered, low-cost water treatment technologies, particularly for regions lacking centralized water and energy infrastructure. Conventional water treatment methods, such as reverse osmosis, are not effective for most produced water clean up based on the high salt levels resulting from fracking. MIT’s water treatment system will remove high-levels of typical water contaminants such as salt,…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

CarbonHouse

This CarbonHouse project seeks to validate that carbon derived from methane pyrolysis can be used as both structural and non-structural building materials. Carbon composites already offer an alternative material paradigm for large, lightweight, high-performance structural uses such as boats and aircraft. CarbonHouse targets gas-pyrolysis production of carbon nanotube (CNT) threads and sheets, with hydrogen co-generated as a supplemental high-energy fuel, which would offer an essentially benign new building logic if it can be managed economically and at vast scale. This…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Multimetallic Layered Composites (MMLCs) for Rapid, Economical Advanced Reactor Deployment

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will lead a team including Georgia Tech, Louisiana Tech, and the Idaho National Lab in developing multimetallic layered composites (MMLCs) for advanced nuclear reactors and assessing how they will improve reactor performance. Rather than seeking complex alloys that offer exceptional mechanical properties or corrosion resistance at unacceptable cost, this team will develop materials with functionally graded layers, each with a specific function. The team will seek general design principles and engineer specific MMLC embodiments. The materials…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2018

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Thermal Energy Grid Storage (TEGS) Using Multi-Junction Photovoltaics (MPV)

MIT will develop critical components for a new, cost-effective, high efficiency power storage system to store renewable energy at grid scale and discharge it on demand. The system combines low-cost, very high-temperature energy storage with high-efficiency, innovative semiconductor converters used to transform heat into electricity. MIT’s technology would store heat at temperatures above 2000°C (3600°F) and convert it to electricity using specialized photovoltaic cells designed to remain efficient under the intense infrared heat a high-temperature emitter radiates. MIT will also develop…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: REMOTE

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Single-Step Methane to Liquid Fuels

The Bioinformatics and Metabolic Engineering Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) led by Prof. Greg Stephanopoulos will develop a comprehensive process to directly convert methane into a usable transportation fuel in a single step. MIT's unique technologies integrate methane activation with fuel synthesis, two distinct processes required to convert methane that are typically performed separately. Today, activating methane prior to converting it to useful fuel is a high-temperature, energy-intensive process. MIT's unique approach would use nitrate instead of oxygen to oxidize…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: TRANSNET

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Sustainable Travel Incentives with Prediction, Optimization and Personalization (TRIPOD)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will develop and test its "Sustainable Travel Incentives with Prediction, Optimization and Personalization" (TRIPOD), a system that could incentivize travelers to pursue specific routes, modes of travel, departure times, vehicle types, and driving styles in order to reduce energy use. TRIPOD relies on an app-based travel incentive tool designed to influence users’ travel choices by offering them real-time information and rewards. MIT researchers will use an open-source simulation platform, SimMobility, and an energy model, TripEnergy, to…


Status: CANCELLED
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: BEETIT

Material Methods

Sound Wave Refrigerants

Material Methods is developing a heat pump technology that substitutes the use of sound waves and an environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional heat pumps. Called a thermoacoustic heat pump, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the heat pump is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. This…


Status: ALUMNI
State: AZ
Project Term: -
Program: METALS

Materials & Electrochemical Research (MER)

Advanced Electrowinning of Titanium

Materials & Electrochemical Research (MER) is scaling up an advanced electrochemical process to produce low-cost titanium from domestic ore. While titanium is a versatile and robust structural metal, its widespread adoption for consumer applications has been limited due to its high cost of production. MER is developing an new electrochemical titanium production process that avoids the cyclical formation of undesired titanium ions, thus significantly increasing the electrical current efficiency. MER will test different cell designs, reduce unwanted side reactions to increase energy…


Status: ALUMNI
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: GRIDS

Materials & Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI)

Advanced Sodium Battery

Materials & Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) is developing a high-strength, low-cost solid-state electrolyte membrane structure for use in advanced grid-scale sodium batteries. The electrolyte, a separator between the positive and negative electrodes, carries charged materials called ions. In the solid electrolyte sodium batteries, sodium ions move through the solid-state ceramic electrolyte. This electrolyte is normally brittle, expensive, and difficult to produce because it is formed over the course of hours in high-temperature furnaces. With MSRI’s design, this ceramic electrolyte will be…


Status: CANCELLED
State: UT
Project Term: -
Program: REBELS

Materials & Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI)

Electrogenerative Cells for Flexible Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel

Materials & Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) is developing an intermediate-temperature fuel cell capable of electrochemically converting natural gas into electricity or liquid fuel in a single step. Existing solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) convert the chemical energy of hydrocarbons—such as hydrogen or methane—into electricity at higher efficiencies than traditional power generators, but are expensive to manufacture and operate at extremely high temperatures, introducing durability and cost concerns over time. Existing processes for converting methane to liquid transportation fuels are also…


Status: ACTIVE
State: CA
Project Term: -
Program: SENSOR

Matrix Sensors

CO2 Sensor for Demand-controlled Ventilation

Matrix Sensors and its partners will develop a low-cost CO2 sensor module that can be used to enable better control of ventilation in commercial buildings. Matrix Sensor's module uses a solid-state architecture that leverages scalable semiconductor manufacturing processes. Key to this architecture is a suitable sensor material that can selectively adsorb CO2, release the molecule when the concentration decreases, and complete this process quickly to enable real-time sensing. The team's design will use a new class of porous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MD
Project Term: -
Program: MONITOR

Maxion Technologies

Tunable Laser for Methane Detection

Maxion Technologies is partnering with Thorlabs Quantum Electronics (TQE), Praevium Research, and Rice University to develop a low cost, tunable, mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser source to be used in systems for detecting and measuring methane emissions. The new architecture is planned to reduce the cost of lasers capable of targeting methane optical absorption lines near 3.3 microns, enabling the development of affordable, high sensitivity sensors. The team will combine Praevium and TQE’s state-of-the-art Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System tunable Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (MEMS-VCSEL)…


Status: ALUMNI
State: SC
Project Term: -
Program: Electrofuels

Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC)

Liquid Fuel from Microbial Communities

Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) is developing an engineered system to create liquid fuels from communities of interdependent microorganisms. MUSC is first pumping carbon dioxide (CO2) and renewable sources of electricity into a battery-like cell. A community of microorganisms uses the electricity to convert the CO2 into hydrogen. That hydrogen is then consumed by another community of microorganisms living in the same system. These new microorganisms convert the hydrogen into acetate, which in turn feed yet another community of microorganisms. This last community of microorganisms…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MA
Project Term: -
Program: GENSETS

Metis Design Corporation (MDC)

Advanced Microturbine Engine for Residential CHP

Metis Design Corporation (MDC) with Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory will develop a Brayton cycle engine for residential use to produce heat and electricity. To begin the cycle, air is drawn into the system where it is compressed and pressurized. This compressed air is then heated in a recuperator and introduced in to the combustion chamber. Fuel is injected in to the combustion chamber and subsequently the air-fuel mixture is ignited. The high temperature exhaust gases then expand through a turbine, providing some of the work that drives the original compressor and the remainder produces…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: DAYS

Michigan State University (MSU)

Scalable Thermochemical Option for Renewable Energy Storage (STORES)

The Michigan State University team will develop a modular thermal energy storage system that uses electricity from sources like wind and solar power to heat up a bed of magnesium manganese oxide (Mg-Mn-O) particles to high temperatures. Once heated, the Mg-Mn-O will release oxygen and store the heat energy in the form of chemical energy. Later, when additional power is needed, the system will pass air over the particle bed, initiating a chemical reaction that releases heat to drive a gas turbine generator. The low cost of magnesium and manganese oxides will enable the system to be cost…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: GENI

Michigan State University (MSU)

Power Flow Controller for Renewables

Michigan State University (MSU) is developing a power flow controller to improve the routing of electricity from renewable sources through existing power lines. The fast, innovative, and lightweight circuitry that MSU is incorporating into its controller will eliminate the need for a separate heavy and expensive transformer, as well as the construction of new transmission lines. MSU's controller is better suited to control power flows from distributed and intermittent wind and solar power systems than traditional transformer-based controllers are, so it will help to integrate more…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: HITEMMP

Michigan State University (MSU)

Heat-Exchanger Intensification through Powder Processing and Enhanced Design (HIPPED)

Michigan State University’s proposed technology is a highly scalable heat exchanger suited for high-efficiency power generation systems that use supercritical CO2 as a working fluid and operate at high temperature and high pressure. It features a plate-type heat exchanger that enables lower cost powder-based manufacturing. The approach includes powder compaction and sintering (powder metallurgy) integrated with laser-directed energy deposition additive manufacturing. Each plate is covered with packed, precisely designed and formed three-dimensional features that promote mixing, intensify heat…


Status: ALUMNI
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: OPEN 2009

Michigan State University (MSU)

Shockwave Engine

Michigan State University (MSU) is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases that expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine's pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU's engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine's rotors…


Status: ACTIVE
State: MI
Project Term: -
Program: SENSOR