Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Florida is developing a power semiconductor module to support the realization of transformative power conversion systems for the grid of tomorrow. The module features higher speeds, better electromagnetic interference immunity, and higher efficiency than legacy silicon-based power electronics modules. If successful, the proposed power modules would enable high-reliability building blocks for a new generation of power electronics converters.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Buffalo is developing an optically controlled high voltage power switching device for enhanced resiliency, reliability, and control of power flow in grid applications. The proposed switches would be made of the ultrawide-bandgap material beta-gallium oxide, which offers benefits including high breakdown strength, scalable melt-grown substrates, and ease of material processing. The University of Buffalo would use an optical cascode architecture to achieve high slew rate operation and noise immunity for the devices.

Slick Sheet: Program

Slick Sheet: Project
RTX Technology Research Center is developing semiconductor switching modules that are triggered using rectified 5G radio frequency rather than low frequency gate drive signals, thereby reducing losses and improving control of power electronics converters for aerospace systems as well as for the grid. These modules will permit the power devices they drive to perform at much higher frequencies than conventional devices, resulting in minimal size, weight, power, and cost while increasing the reliability and efficiency of future power systems.

Slick Sheet: Project
Opcondys is developing a light-controlled grid protection device to suppress destructive sudden and short-lived surges in energy on the grid caused by lightning and electromagnetic pulses. The proposed protection module improves upon current slower surge protection devices by using high-voltage photoconductive power electronics with nanosecond response times. If successful, any sudden and short-lived disruption through utility lines will auto-trigger the module, halting a disruption from traveling any further and protecting grid-connected equipment.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Pennsylvania is developing an integrated module featuring wide-bandgap power devices to improve electric grid control, resilience, and reliability. The proposed co-packaged module integrates high-speed gate driving, optical power delivery, signal isolation, remote sensing, and protection. The module will non-invasively monitor the voltage and current of wide-bandgap devices and would have higher noise immunity than state-of-the-art.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Arkansas is developing a heterogeneously integrated power module for applications in the electric power grid and electrified transportation. The module will integrate capacitors, sensors, and integrated circuits, enabling next generation, more reliable power electronics. University of Arkansas’ proposed technology could open the door for up to a 10-fold improvement in switching performance compared with the state of the art.

Slick Sheet: Project
GaNify is developing a power integrated circuit building block that would enable an enhanced control of power electronics converters for a more efficient and reliable grid. GaNify’s medium-voltage gallium nitride light-controlled integrated circuit takes advantage of low cost, manufacturable, and scalable components to design and build an integrated wide-bandgap semiconductor module for grid-level power electronics. If successful, the module would feature high noise immunity, enhanced protection, and five-fold lower power loss than legacy silicon-based technology.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville will develop scalable light-triggered semiconductor switch modules for the protection of grid and aviation power systems. The proposed switch module seeks to achieve cost savings, fast switching speeds, and built-in redundancy by using sub-modules featuring lower-voltage and lower-current silicon carbide devices for desired higher application voltage and current levels.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is developing ultrawide-bandgap switching devices that would achieve a five times higher voltage than the state-of-the-art, enabling more sophisticated control methods for the grid. The proposed switching devices take advantage of beta-gallium oxide, an ultrawide-bandgap material that possess inherently superior properties compared with legacy silicon switching devices. UCSB’s switching device will be optically powered and controlled to limit the effects of electromagnetic interference.