Blog Posts
ARPA-E focuses on next-generation energy innovation to create a sustainable energy future. The agency provides R&D support to businesses, universities, and national labs to develop technologies that could fundamentally change the way we get, use, and store energy. Since 2009, ARPA-E has provided approximately $2 billion in support to more than 800 energy technology projects. In January, we introduced a new series to highlight the transformational technology our project teams are developing across the energy portfolio. Check out these projects turning ideas into reality.

Blog Posts
ARPA-E strives for excellence in both program development and program integration, to encourage new discussions and new perspectives.  This approach was on display at the recent ARPA-E “Ocean Week,” held from January 28-30, in Washington.  This three-day voyage into ARPA-E’s ocean-focused programs consisted of three events: The Macroalgae Research Inspiring Novel Energy Resources (MARINER) Program Review, the Aerodynamic Turbines Lighter and Afloat with Nautical Technologies and Integrated Servo-control (ATLANTIS) Program Kickoff, and a Submarine Hydrokinetic Industry Day.

Blog Posts
Newest ARPA-E Program Director Dr. Robert (Bob) J. Ledoux’s professional experience ranges from professor to entrepreneur and his patents from nonintrusive cargo inspection to medical technologies. Recently we had a chance to visit with Dr. Ledoux to discuss how he will bring his experience to bear to further ARPA-E’s mission.

Slick Sheet: Project
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) aims to develop a complete system to remove low-level methane from high-flow gaseous streams associated with coal mining. Because state-of-the-art mine ventilation air systems offer zero methane conversion, the system will be developed and tested on ventilation air methane. MIT’s design will include real-time input determination, output performance sensing, advanced machine learning algorithms, and feedback control for process optimization.

Slick Sheet: Project
Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) seeks to reduce methane emissions from compressor station natural gas (NG) engines by improving lean-burn operation, thereby reducing exhaust methane and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and maintaining low-criteria pollutant emissions. The project team will develop a nanosecond non-thermal plasma-based ignition system capable of generating radicals, ions, and highly reactive intermediate species that result in rapid self-sustaining combustion, and a cyclic combustion control strategy that predicts and mitigates partial-fire and misfire cycles.

Slick Sheet: Project
Johnson Matthey, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Consol Energy will adapt the Catalytic Oxidation METhane (COMET™) methane abatement system to convert vent air methane at a Consol Energy coal mining site. The COMET methane system has shown potential for controlling dilute methane emissions. The team will use cost-effective technology to achieve over 99.5% methane conversion efficiency at temperatures below 1112 ºF for methane concentration in the range of 0.1-1.6%, representing nearly all ventilation air methane sources in the U.S.

Slick Sheet: Project
Marquette University will enable an innovative combustion technology for lean-burn (high air-fuel ratio) natural gas engines to potentially reduce the amount of methane slip—or methane in the inlet fuel stream that escapes to the atmosphere—to 0.25% of the inlet fuel stream. The 0.25% target would represent a 90% reduction from current levels. The proposed system aims to achieve a non-premixed, mixing-controlled combustion process with natural gas in a lean-burn engine through an actively fueled prechamber.

Slick Sheet: Project
The University of Minnesota will develop a non-thermal, low-temperature, plasma-assisted system for (1) in-situ flare gas reforming, (2) ignition, and (3) flame stabilization for small, unmanned pipe flares. Flares safely dispose of waste gases by burning them under controlled conditions. The new system will substantially enhance fuel reactivity by producing intermediate species such as ethylene, acetylene, and hydrogen. These hydrocarbons are highly reactive compared with methane and dramatically increase flare efficiency.

Slick Sheet: Project
More information on this project is coming soon!