Electrochemical Carbon Capture



Program:
OPEN 2012
Award:
$3,471,515
Location:
Tempe,
Arizona
Status:
ALUMNI
Project Term:
03/12/2013 - 02/28/2017

Critical Need:

Coal-fired power plants provide nearly 50% of all electricity in the U.S. While coal is a cheap and abundant natural resource, its continued use contributes to rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere. Capturing and storing this CO2 would reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas levels while allowing power plants to continue using inexpensive coal. Carbon capture and storage represents a significant cost to power plants that must retrofit their existing facilities to accommodate new technologies.

Project Innovation + Advantages:

Arizona State University (ASU) is developing an innovative electrochemical technology for capturing the CO2 released by coal-fired power plants. ASU’s technology aims to cut both the energy requirements and cost of CO2 capture technology in half compared to today’s best methods. Presently, the only proven commercially viable technology for capturing CO2 from coal plants uses a significant amount of energy, consuming roughly 40% of total power plant output. If installed today, this technology would increase the cost of electricity production by 85%. ASU is advancing a fundamentally new paradigm for CO2 capture using novel electrochemical reactants to separate and capture CO2. This process could be easily scaled and integrated in conventional fossil fuel power generation facilities.

Potential Impact:

If successful, ASU’s electrochemical technology would reduce the cost of capturing CO2 by 50% compared to existing processes and establish a new manufacturing industry for large-scale applications.

Security:

Enabling continued use of domestic coal for electricity generation will preserve the stability of the electric grid.

Environment:

Carbon capture technology could prevent more than 800 million tons of CO2 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year.

Economy:

Improving the cost-effectiveness of carbon capture methods will minimize added costs to homeowners and businesses using electricity generated by coal-fired power plants for the foreseeable future.

Contact

ARPA-E Program Director:
Dr. Grigorii Soloveichik
Project Contact:
Dr. Dan Buttry
Press and General Inquiries Email:
ARPA-E-Comms@hq.doe.gov
Project Contact Email:
dan.buttry@asu.edu

Related Projects


Release Date:
11/28/2012